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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 637 (some duplicates have been removed)
the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however,
believed them. today's report says that much never happen again. >> learning about science may become a thing of the past for school children in indonesia. the government wants to cancel science class is to make more room for religion and nationalism. teachers say it is a move backwards. >> learning about the newton laws of motion by launching a rocket. it is a fun exercise for children around the world. indonesian children might soon miss out on such experiments. if the government goes ahead with its plan to take science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool, lots of useful objects can be made through science. with science, we can create unique objects. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. professor in biotechnology.
a science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool. lots of beautiful, objects can be made through science. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. >> the education ministry says there too overburdened for such causes and they want schools to focus mainly on religion, nationalism, the indonesian language, and math. that would mean the end of signs causes so they could learn about their country's frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. >> they are the right age to learn. they are ready to learn the basic concepts of science. what about their future? >> fascinated to listen to listen to the explanation about the many volcanoes. science is important to learn the way of thinking. they say it is necessary for them to be able to compete internationally. indonesia's's booming economy is growing more than 6% per year and they urgently need to educate their young regeneration. compared with neighboring countries, they have few scientists add that not many can afford to study abroad. >> we cannot rely on a small group. we need a critical mass of educated, sophisticated middle
. tonight, jim's got two exclusives. the ceos of nps pharma and exact sciences just ahead. >>> and later, king of the hill. they're the two top performers in the dow last year. but 2013 isn't big enough for both of them. with the big mortgage settlement behind them, could bank of america deposit returns for you this year, or should the housing rebound keep home depot in your sights? cramer decides. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail at jimcramercnbc.com or call 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on ev
important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
disrespectful towards science, i had prostate cancer five years ago and without radiation, we wouldn't be here talking so i'm not going to bad mouth science as such but science can deal to put it simply only with fact, it cannot deal with values and human life is a mix of facts and values and so what i believe and what has been the compile ration of my life is trying to help my student see that we need vision to look at life in the world with the factual information that science gives us, but not do it through one eye only but then bring in the world of values and there the world's great religious traditions are what i have come to call the wisdom tradition of the human race but when we come to values, they are like the data banks and that's why i love my career, spending my career more in myself in the great even during perspectives of these religions rather than adding kohl's to new contacts will and dwelling on modern science. >> ago democrat yeah is certainly not the best for someone who has a religious interest. >> that is a fair statement. let's take you from the university of chicago wh
sandy, t the disappearing ice slights at the north pole becoming ever harder to ignore but science and facts continue to demonstrate that yes climate change is real. so no one should really be surprised the last year was the hottest on record for north america, shattering the old record by one entire degree. that may not sound like a lot but keep in mind, if the world's average temperature increases by 5 degrees scientists think sea levels could climb as much as 20 feet causing cities like miami new orleans, to go the route of atlantis. skeptics keep on being skeptics. you are right. climate change science is a sinister conspiracy by the entire world scientific community to slightly reduce corporate profit by convincing people that air pollution is bad. that makes a lot more sense. joining us now via skype is heroic environmentalist and founder of 350.org the man who's become the leading face in the movement to raise awareness about climate change, bill mckickin'. it is an honor to have you here on the program. >> very good to be with you. >> john: is it worst that we broke the rec
that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted
to go to another meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to bre
, visit >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands,
in answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we ca
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
. and those of you who study the science understand what i'm talking about. you need proper brain chemistry to, through these very important glands, hypothalamus and pituitary, to communicate with the gonads >>yeah. in doing the research for the show john, and i was reading about, testosterone levels in men usually peak around dawn, like four, five o'clock in the morning now. in ancient times it's because we were going out hunting and gathering in doubt killing things to bring back for food. >>>dinosaurs >> talks to the issue of morning erections >>>um hum >>and as men lose this, that doesn't happen for them anymore, right? >>>well, first off, i'm here for moral, ethical, consensual sexual reasons. we are procreative creatures. it's in our genetic code whether we are consciously aware of it or not. >> creatures. man is been pretty good at it. because i remember reading that we only started out with two people, and now were about 7 billion. so we're really good at procreating. the sexual responses given to us by the universe or mother nature. we are tested to see if we are capable of inseminati
don't want to be the person that denies it. there's too much science. there was a moment in the early 90s and that was when i had my first kid. i mean, this is really selfish, you know. i had my first kid and i thought, oh, my gosh. i started learning about what was really going on. they talked about greenhouse. remember, the time magazine said, "what is the greenhouse effect?" there was a moment where we were all really motivated and then i don't know what happened. personally, i think the oil companies and i think that a lot of people whose pockets are lined by them just devastated that conversation. tavis: what do you think it is gonna take for that conversation to get traction with everyday american people? i say the average american because it is not like these issues aren't discussed. it is not like people, you know, can't feel that something in the environment -- whether you understand global warming or climate change or not, it is pretty hard to deny that the weather patterns are changing. i mean, your regular joe can tell that something is happening. >> oh, yeah. ranchers are
ensure that rules are based on good data and sound science. third, we are going to see -- you're going to see a significant respond to expand the expertise of our law firm, the national chamber litigation center. and in other areas of our institution in order to deal with expanding regulation. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory process. and we do that on a daily basis, but when rights have been trampled on, our regulators have overstepped their bounds, well, we will then just take necessary legal action. now let me turn to something we should all care about any very important way, that's immigration reform. america has grown because we have attracted and welcome some of the most talented and the hard-working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities. they invest and invent in our technological companies. they staff our hospitals. they care for our elderly and our young. they harvest our food and they serve in our armed forces. given are changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy. support our ret
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
describes what she saw in her first period science class this morning when she says a classmate walked in with a shotgun and started shooting. >> didn't like he was aiming for anybody for certain at the time. but we looked back and the kid made a joke that got shot, he said, dude, i got shot. we thought it was just something fake. >> reporter: she says at first she thought it was a joke or possibly a drill. then she says she saw blood on the classmate's shoulder. >> he was kind of bloody. and everyone ran to the back of the classroom except for a few of us. we stayed at our desks. >> reporter: aldridge said the gunman came in intending to shoot one specific student. >> the kid was saying i'm only looking for this person, just one person. and that kid kind of popped his head up behind where he was hiding and said i'm sorry. and then he kept saying i'm sorry. >> reporter: she said the teacher then convinced the boy to lower the weapon and the security guard arrived and he was taken into custody. >> he was one of those kids like awkward a little nerdy
medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affirmation -- you cannot put a price on a. >> he will be honored at the white house in a ceremony later this year. dr. gates received his degrees and ph.d. from mit. he has done postgraduate work at harvard and caltech. tim tooten, wbal tv-11 news. >> coming up, another staff choice on capitol hill. >> president obama's nomination for treasury secretary. >> different, emotional approaches to saturday's showdown. later in s
that rejects maybe what might fit on a bumper sticker but is at least based in science. >> jennifer: so are you arguing that the smart initiatives that you are talking about are based in brain science or is it more in an economic pragmatic -- do you have more an economic or pragmatic take on it? >> i think it's both. i think we learned so much about marijuana today than the last 30 years. it's sort of ironic we have also seen the descendants of legalization. today's marijuana is not the marijuana of the wood stock days. it's five to seven times more potent. it also had less of other ingredients like cbd which actually don't make you high and what that does to the adolescent brain is startling. heavy persistent use leads to significant iq loss among young people. the british medical journal showed that marijuana intoxication doubles your car crash risk. so we just want to get the public health message out there for the american people to know about, since the only discussion seems to be bombarded with legalization and a promise of revenue, and getting rid of the
to go to on the far side of the unknown that can do the robotic science, can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen, which is fuel. a conference recently in hawaii, i was following a workshop that has been setting up international lunar bases by practicing on the big island of hawaii. you will assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down or you expected to land, another one down some distance away -- how do you put them together? do that through a satellite -- motion control. you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why my so enthusiastic about that? that is exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the noon of mars who can then assemble a base that we will then send people. we should assure ourselves that we protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere. that is the moon, too. >> a two-part question -- do you believe in extraterrestrial life? >> i hope so. >> are we presumptuous enough to think we are the on
and reduce those overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be th
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
.com. i don't know if it is a science or running the data. whatever it is, i want to talk about it. i had no idea you were bringing this in. >> it is the real thing. they rarely go up for sale. only oscars made before 1950 can be bought and sold. this is from 1946. it is anna and the king of siam, best set decoration. it was up for best picture and wind on to inspire "the king and i." >> why would anyone want to sell the oscar? >> in this case, it was the grandson. his grandfather had won several and he wanted to dispose of one of them. bill murray, i was very upset there was no mention of bill murray. >> it is delightful. >> he is amazing. am i out of it. did i expect he was going to be nominated? >> a lot of jaw-dropping a-listers. there was no. there were a lot more stars like quvenzhane. she is the best star. >> i asked, was this a big deal for you. was it ever? >> i asked her, do you have your acceptance speech ready for the oscars. she said, i'm still working on it. >> did she really say that, nine years old. she is going to be a big hit. >>> apart from the snubs, no real surprise t
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
to us for the truth. they come to us for science. >> they say, we need someone to tell us what this product tastes like. and how it smells and what it looks like and what its texture is. but we get very consistent, almost machine-like terms. >> the food that comes into the lab mirrors what americans are buying or eating. remember the '90s, when everything had to be fat-free. that trend gave way to products that are organic and all-natural. now, the food tasters are encountering food that's free of sodium and gluten-free. >> looking at the formula, puts it on the shelf. it really doesn't happen that way. the food companies are working on something all the time to make sure it's the most competitive product out there. >> reporter: professional taste testers are hired for not only their acute taste and smell. but ability to verbalize what they observe. >> things they might not notice, they can key in on. >> reporter: the next time you give thanks at a meal, thanks these ladies, as well. they're doing this. so you don't have to. in livermore, nbc bay area news. >> that answered one
and science, because my teacher uses chinese to explain. if the teachers didn't teach my cousins and my sisters and me how to speak chinese, we wouldn't be able to speak in restaurants. once again, thank you. [applause] [speaking foreign language] >> good evening, everyone, i am winnie chi, i am the body president of alice fong yu, this is like a second home to me. the teachers and my friends support me and they make me feel special. and also staff members and teachers guarantee that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with people that can only speak chinese. and it will
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 637 (some duplicates have been removed)